A BLOG ABOUT ALL THINGS 13.1

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11 Jul 2016

Seven Ways to Sneak in Running Time

This blog post was written by marathon enthusiast and coach Esther Dill and was originally posted on her blog, Marathon-Mommy.com. Be sure to check out more of Esther’s training tips here!

The biggest complaint I hear from friends who want to run but don’t is that they don’t have time to run.

Lack of time is one of the most popular excuses for missing regular runs. But when you do take the time to run, you may actually find that you’ll have more energy and be more efficient at getting things done.

Here are some tips to help:

Run Somewhere You Need to Go.

You can literally “run” some errands. Next time you have to go to the grocery store or mail a letter, run to the nearest grocery store, post office, or mailbox instead of driving there. (You don’t have to run back if you have stuff to carry, of course.)

Hit the Stairs.

Instead of waiting for the elevator, head for the stairs and start running (footwear permitting, of course!).

Run With Your Dog.

Instead of letting him out in the backyard, give both of you some exercise by taking your dog (or letting him take you) for a jaunt through the neighborhood.

Break Up Your Run.

Don’t assume that you have to run 30 minutes all at once. If you have 15 minutes to run on the treadmill before you start making dinner, go for it. Then, while dinner is cooking, jump on for another 15 minutes. As long as you do the segments in the same day, your body is basically getting the same benefits as if you ran all the miles in one workout.

Turn Off the TV.

You can fit in a 30-minute run just by giving up one sitcom – especially if it’s a rerun. You’ll definitely feel a lot better and you probably won’t feel like you’re missing out.

Or, Use Your Tube Time.

If you absolutely can’t miss your favorite programs, get in a few miles on the treadmill while you’re watching. You can use the commercials to mark changes in your incline or pace.

Socialize on the Run.

Some of my best running times are when I can meet a friend on the trail and catch up with life. The miles fly by fast. Instead of having lunch or coffee with a friend, catch up with buddies during a run. Set regular dates with running friends, so you’ll be more motivated to run.

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22 Jun 2016

Eight Tips for Running in the Heat

This blog post was originally posted on www.afoodiestaysfit.com.

I don’t know about the weather where you live, but it is HOT in Winston-Salem. HOT & HUMID. I love running outside but with weather like this, it can be downright dangerous.

Here are eight tips for keeping cool while maintaining your hot running bod in the hot summer months.

1) Run in the off hours. The best option for running in the heat: don’t run in the peak heat. Go early or go late. I find that going early is cooler since the temperature has all night to drop and the roads aren’t still radiating heat from the hot day.

2) Wear breathable, wicking clothing in light colorsPlease, for the love of all that is good and wise, don’t wear cotton, especially if you live in a humid environment. It will trap the heat escaping from your body, hold onto your sweat, make you hotter, and slow you down when your shirt gets heavy from sweat. And other runners will scoff at you. 😉 Check TJ Maxx and Dick’s Sporting Goods for deals.

Wasatch Back RElay2[ This was at the end of my third leg of the Wasatch Back Relay.
The temps for this run were in the high 90s at an altitude around 7000 feet.]

3) Carry water. Drink 16 oz before you head out and carry water, even for distances when you normally wouldn’t. In the cooler months, I rarely carry water with me on runs shorter than six miles. But in the heat, I run with water. In hot temps, you will dehydrate more quickly and that water might be your savior mid-run. I love this water bottle; it straps onto your hand so you don’t have to grip it and it has a pouch for keys, a phone, etc.

4) If the sun is up, wear sunscreen. I slather SPF 70 on my face and SPF 30 on the rest of my body. Don’t worry about the sunscreen blocking your sweat. You’ll still sweat just fine. 🙂

5) Wear a breathable hat and/or sunglasses to protect your face and eyes. Squinting sucks when you’re running. I love my white Nike hat.

32292-281-017f

6) Run more slowly than your typical pace. Go by your typical effort instead of your typical pace.  Your regular pace will feel harder in the heat and humidity. Your body will adapt eventually but don’t let slower runs discourage you. And don’t push your pace if you’re not feeling strong.

7) Run with someone or tell someone when you’re going and when you’ll be back. And then check back in so they don’t worry. You never know what can happen on a run, so this is always a good idea, but especially a good idea when you’re running in extreme temps.

8 ) Listen to your body. Have no shame in taking walk breaks. Have no shame in calling it quits.  If you don’t feel well during the run, don’t push your limits. If you feel dizzy, if you notice you aren’t sweating like you normally do, or if something just doesn’t feel right, back it off and call it a day. There is no shame in knowing and listening your body.

Or reveling in massive amounts of sweat. 🙂

Meet Teri Hutcheon: Teri is a Race 13.1 blog contributor and has been running for over 15 years and runs multiple half marathons and 5Ks every year (sometimes multiple races a month!) and has run one marathon (so far!). She shares her running tales and workouts on her blog, www.afoodiestaysfit.com. You can also find her on Twitter and Instagram (@afoodiestaysfit), and Facebook.com/afoodiestaysfitblog.

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18 May 2016

Snack Like a True Runner!

You’ve heard people say “I’m a runner, I can eat what I want.” This may be true in ways for those with high metabolisms, but it is only becoming more apparent that eating well boosts performance in both training and racing.

When you cut out junk from your diet, it leaves more room for nutrient dense food that can aid performance in many ways. Whole foods are often packed with vitamins and minerals that can boost blood flow, promote weight loss, and give you more energy that other processed food. Not only are whole foods better for you, but processed foods can quite literally be harmful to your running.The scariest part is that often these foods are labeled at “healthy” and “low calorie” products in our grocery stores.

There are many simple ways to make small steps towards big changes, starting with making your own healthy on-the-go snacks. These date rolled energy bites are great for runners because they are high in carbs, rich in nutrients, and even more satisfying and delicious than anything you can buy off the shelf. Make them for a pre-run breakfast or a grab and go post work out snack!

Ingredients

  1. 6 dates
  2. 1 c warm water (you only use 3 tbsp in the energy bites)
  3. 1 c rolled oats
  4. 1 tbsp flax seeds
  5. 1/4 c hazelnuts
  6. 1/2 c almond butter
  7. 1 tbsp honey
  8. 1 tbsp cocoa powder
  9. 1/4 tsp vanilla
  10. Pinch of salt

Instructions

  1. Soak your dates for 5 minutes in the cup of warm water
  2. After soaking, cut the dates down the middle and remove and discard the pits, but save the water (you’ll add some in at the end)
  3. In a food processor, grind the oats, flax, and hazelnuts into a flour for about 20 seconds
  4. Add all ingredients with the exception of the water and process until it forms a paste
  5. You may need to stir it and scrape down the sides 2-4 times
  6. Add 3 tablespoons of the date water
  7. Roll the paste into 1 inch balls and refrigerate to harden for at least 30 minutes
  8. You can store them in the fridge or longterm in the freezer. Enjoy!

Meet Margaret: Margaret Molteni is a runner who moved to Memphis from Nashville to work as a Recreational Therapist, assisting individuals with disabilities. Outside of work, you can find her training for her next marathon, cooking, blogging, and always eating. For more healthy and delicious recipes or all things running, visit Margaret’s site at www.youngandrungry.com.

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14 Mar 2016

5 Ways to Curb Your Nerves for Your First Half Marathon

Signing up and running your first half marathon can at times be very intimidating. Here are five tips to give you the confidence you need to run your first 13.1 with excitement and ease!

  1. Sign Up with a Friend – If there’s one thing to learn from Amy Cragg and Shalane Flanagan’s strategy during the 2016 Olympic Time Trials, it’s that sometimes all you need is your best bud by your side to get you to the finish. Going at it with a sidekick will make the entire event more enjoyable as well as provide you with constant moral support both during training and in the race itself.
  1. Train Smart – Using a coach or a professional training plan to gear up for the race takes a lot of guess work out of training. It’ll ensure that you are more than ready for the event and take away a lot of pre-race jitters knowing that you’ve done all you can in preparation. Be sure to check out Race 13.1’s FREE training plans to help you get started!
  1. Do a Trial Run – Before the race, do your last long run in everything you plan on wearing and taking with you for the real deal. Wear the exact shoes, socks, shorts, and shirt. If you plan on carrying water or nutrition, practice eating and drinking the exact amounts that you think you might need for the race to minimize any unforeseen surprises.
  2. Don’t Set a Goal Time – If you’re someone who tends to put too much pressure on yourself, consider not setting a timed goal for your first half marathon. Yes, having a goal can be very motivating, but sometimes it’s accomplishment just to finish. Not only will it take a lot of pressure off of your performance, but not checking your watch obsessively will also give you a chance to enjoy more of the atmosphere around you.
  3. Don’t Take Yourself Too Seriously – Go out of your way to create great memories for your first race! Wear a costume, take selfies, give spectators high fives on the sidelines. Don’t ever take the fun out of running!

Meet Margaret: Margaret Molteni is a runner who moved to Memphis from Nashville to work as a Recreational Therapist, assisting individuals with disabilities. Outside of work, you can find her training for her next marathon, cooking, blogging, and always eating. For more healthy and delicious recipes or all things running, visit Margaret’s site at www.youngandrungry.com.

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25 Feb 2016

Big News for Race 13.1!

Dear Runners,

We are excited to share some big news for Race 13.1, for the Raleigh Running Community, and for our city! Recently, we came to an agreement with the City of Oaks Marathon, Inc. Board of Directors for Race 13.1 to take over the operation and management of the City of Oaks Marathon, Rex Healthcare Half Marathon, and Old Reliable 10k. Race 13.1 and City of Oaks have worked closely together for the last four years, sharing best practices and providing support and assistance for each other at races. Race 13.1 owes the City of Oaks team a great deal of appreciation and gratitude for their guidance and assistance when Race 13.1 began with a single event that started the Midtown Race Series and in turn became what is now Race 13.1.

CofOaksMarathon_choice-02       RACE131SQUARE2

For the past 10 years, the City of Oaks Marathon has been led by its all-volunteer Board of Directors, in addition to the dedication and hard work of the event’s Race Director, Ron Wahula, over the past five years. The board and Ron, who we’re excited will continue as the Race Director, have built an event that not only provides an incredible race experience for runners, but also gives back significantly to the local community. Producing an event of the quality and size of City of Oaks take a great deal of work and sacrifice. The realities of time commitments for the race’s large number of volunteers, coupled with a strong desire to ensure that the race remain in hands of a local organization that is wholly committed to the city of Raleigh and its running community made this transition a natural fit.

From the runner’s perspective, the race will remain a standalone event that showcases the best of our city. We are dedicated to ensuring that this race remains the same exceptional City of Oaks Marathon that we all know and love. Like many of you, members of our team at Race 13.1 have been direct beneficiaries of the hard work and dedication of the City of Oaks Board through participating in past races and being residents of the city of Raleigh where much of their charitable work has been directed.

We are honored and excited to carry this race forward. We are committed to building on the incredible foundation that has been established over the past nine years, working diligently to ensure that the charitable work in our city continues as a result of this great event, and continuing to create a first-class race experience for runners, partners, and sponsors. The City of Oaks Marathon organization and its board will remain intact and continue with their charitable work in the community, which will be made possible by the continued contributions to the City of Oaks Marathon 501c3 Non-Profit from the race proceeds.

The November 6, 2016 City of Oaks Marathon will be the 10th anniversary of the race, and we look forward to announcing some new initiatives in the months to come to celebrate this anniversary and continue to improve the experience of our runners.

We thank the City of Oaks Board of Directors for entrusting us with this great responsibility, and we thank the Raleigh Running Community for their dedication to running local. We are committed to going the extra mile for every single participant, whether they finish first or last, to ensure that this race honors the hard work that it takes for each participant to get to the start line. We can’t wait to see each of you at the start line in November!

Thank you,

Race 13.1 & City of Oaks Marathon

17 Feb 2016

Run Like Meb

The 2016 Charleston Marathon was a disappointing race for me. I left the event feeling discouraged and disillusioned with running. Strangely enough, my despondency was in no way related to my running performance that day. Actually, I didn’t run at all; I was a spectator. Having run a marathon a mere week before, I was in prime spectating condition. I felt I could be of great support to the Charleston Marathoners, particularly along the course’s toughest points: the scenic wasteland at mile 9, and the dreaded traffic circle runners would enter and reenter from miles 18-23.

My BRF Rosemary and I formulated a plan that allowed us to cheer on friends running the race. Saturday night I created marginally funny signs of support. By 8:30 a.m. on Sunday morning, we were positioned at mile 9, just across from Waste Services and Container Salvage Co. When the leaders started coming through around 8:45, we cheered like we were crowd support at the US Olympic Marathon Trials.

Few runners glanced our way.

No nods, no tiny waves. Nonetheless, we continued holding our ridiculous signs and cheering for every runner like he was an Olympian. I thought for sure when “slower” runners like me started coming through, they would be the ones smiling, nodding, waving, and/or shouting words of thanks. Although quite a few smiled or chuckled to themselves as they turned our corner, most avoided eye contact and looked like they were trying to pretend two weirdos weren’t out alone in the cold holding stupid signs. After our friend Paul came through, we gave up with mile 9 and moved on to mile 18. Surely at this point in the race, the marathoners would need all the support they could get.

Mile 18 looked much like mile 9, though the runners were spread further apart from each other and wore more pronounced grimaces of the pain and exhaustion. Rosemary and I, now part of a small handful of spectators, continued to cheer madly and wave signs. The runners, by and large, ignored us.

I left the race feeling confused. Were these Charleston Marathoners made of sterner stuff than I? Did they need no cheering squad? Were they such bada**es they couldn’t lift a hand to wave or make eye contact to acknowledge their supporters?

My question was answered the day of the US Marathon Trials in Los Angeles. The Trials saw athletes like Des Linden round the final corner and raise her hands to arouse even more cheers from the crowd. Meb Keflezighi rounded that same turn carrying an American flag and high fiving spectators who lined the streets. Amy Hastings Cragg, who won the women’s race, stayed close to the finish line so she could watch an exhausted Shalane Flanagan cross the finish line in third. When Shalane collapsed, Cragg (who must have been exhausted herself) was the first to catch her as she fell. Linden, Keflezighi, and Cragg are some of the fastest runners in the world, and they all took the time to thank the crowd, or show their support to those who supported them.

Image used from Shalane Flanagan's Instagram account

Image used from Shalane Flanagan’s Instagram account

So runners, I challenge you to be more like Meb. In fact, I ask all of you, what are you doing to show your appreciation of those in the crowd? If the one of the fastest marathoners in the world can high five spectators at the US Marathon Trials, you can at least crack a smile or salute your fans. While spectators don’t attend a marathon expecting thanks for what they do, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t give it.


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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08 Feb 2016

Football Widow Respite

Last Sunday I realized I am a football widow. I am one of those poor women who loses her husband to the NFL all day Sunday, Monday nights, and (darn you football) Thursday nights, too. While thousands of fans cheer madly for the Washington Redskins, Jacksonville Jaguars, or the Carolina Panthers, I silently mourn the loss of my husband’s attention for four quarters.

Unlike other football widows, for whom the light at the end of the tunnel is only starting to show now that the Super Bowl is over, a little light was gifted to me every Sunday. You see, Sunday is my husband’s long run day, and not even football can stop what an upcoming marathon has put in motion: race training. Last Sunday, for fifty-five minutes and forty-seven seconds, I had my husband all to myself. There was no need to compete with DeMarco Murray, A.J. Green, or the Manning Brothers. Justin and I were out on the road, me on my cruiser bike, basket stocked with water and Gatorade, he keeping pace beside me. For eight miles, I was free from football.

An even greater gift is a race weekend. Due to Justin’s work schedule, we run a lot of half marathons on Sundays. This means while football is happening, we are either running a race, celebrating just finishing a race, or driving home from a race. All three of these possibilities free us from the cables that bind our lives to the NFL. We are free to enjoy each other’s company without Todd Gurley or Rob Gronkowski tagging along like a third wheel.

So, thank you running. Thank you for being a sport that doesn’t involve pass interferences, fantasy drafts, or the NFL Network. Thank you for putting my husband and me out on the open road, with only ourselves for company. Thank you for not being football.

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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15 Jan 2016

A Motorist’s Guide to Runners

It can get pretty hairy out there for motorists who must share the road with other vehicles, mopeds, bicycles, runners, walkers, and occasional stray chickens or spooked cats. As someone who is both a runner and a motorist, I feel I can advise on how to courteously and safely share the road with runners. As for advice on sharing the road with bicyclists and wildlife, you’ll have to find another expert.

Dear Motorist,

1. If I am running in the bike lane, please stay in your lane. Don’t try to assert your vehicular prowess by aiming for me when I am in a lane reserved for the slower and smaller. You stay in your space, I’ll stay in mine.

2. If the speed limit in a small neighborhood is 20 miles an hour, don’t go 45. Don’t even go 35. There are runners out there, as well as walkers, their dogs, and children playing in the street. Do what you need to on the highway, but when you pull into your neighborhood, slow it down and try to enjoy the fact that you are almost home.

3. If no cars are approaching in the opposite direction on any given road, it would be courteous of you to move your vehicle over a foot or two. In instances like this, you can think of the road like a movie theater. If the theater is crowded, other moviegoers get it when you must sit right next to them. If the road is crowded, as a runner, I get it when you can’t move over. If a movie theater is empty, it’s just weird to sit right next to someone you don’t know. Same is true on the roads. If no one is coming and motorists don’t move over, it’s just weird.

4. If you want to roll down your car window and yell something like, “You go girl! Attack that hill!” while I’m running up a killer hill, please feel free do so. This might give me the adrenaline boost I need to make it to the top. On the other hand, if you feel like catcalling, keep your window rolled up and your dirty thoughts to yourself. I’m marathon training, for Pete’s sake!

5. Keep your trash and other items inside your vehicle. The road is not your garbage can, and I don’t want to see your McDonald’s wrappers littering the Johns Island bridge or have to hurdle an old couch cushion to continue on my run. This is marathon training, people, not the steeplechase.

6. Remember your humanity. While the safety of our vehicles makes it easier to be more aggressive and disconnected from others, remember you are a human, as are those runners out there on the roads. Follow the rules of common courtesy, don’t just reserve them for dinner parties and meeting your in-laws for the first time.

Sincerely,

Someone who is a runner and a motorist

 

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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21 Dec 2015

Runner Profile: 15x Race 13.1 Finisher Amy Enz

Amy Enz is one of just seven of our runners who completed 13 or more Race 13.1 half marathons in 2015 ! We’re excited to feature Amy, who actually finished 15 total races with us this year – the most of any Race 13.1 runner – in this month’s runner profile! Click here to see more of our runners who earned their 13x, 7x and 3x bonus medals this year, and check out more Bonus Bling opportunities here!

  1. Amy EnzDid you always plan to run this many Race 13.1 races this year? What motivated you to run this many? I didn’t always plan to run this many Race 13.1 races. I thought the seasons pass was a unique and innovative idea that would allow me to run at least seven of the races. After all the spring races, I discovered the series scoring on the website and saw how many people had run just as many, or more races than I had. I guess the competitive part of me decided then that I’d like to run the most races out of everyone. I love a good challenge!
  2. What do you enjoy about Race 13.1 events? I love that Race 13.1 gives me an affordable opportunity to have mini vacations where I get to try new things, accomplish new challenges and do what I love, to run.
  3. What’s your favorite part of racing? I truly believe runners are just incredible people. Whether you come to win, to raise awareness or money for charity, in a group, as an individual, to lose weight, to maintain weight, to push your limits, to dress up, to have fun or just to enjoy being around amazing people outdoors, everyone truly inspires me and I like being around that energy.
  4. What motivates you to keep racing? There are so many reasons to keep going! There’s always a new challenge to overcome, a new theme to be a part of, an awesome medal to collect or a ‘top’ race to check off the list. I especially like inaugural events and being the first to run that particular course. Most importantly though, running makes me healthy physically and mentally. I don’t think I’ll ever run out of goals because I just keep making new ones!
  5. Speaking of goals, have you set any goals for 2016? I want to become a Marathon Manic (Online Running Club) and Double Agent (when you are qualified as a Marathon Manic and Half Fanatic) by running six half marathons and six full marathons in a six-month time frame!
  6. How long have you been running and racing half marathons? I’ve actually been running cross country and or track since middle school. I was never really fast but I enjoyed running and being part of the team. I was lucky enough to be on teams that didn’t cut people, but I didn’t always compete because that was based on performance. In 2009 I met ‘Coach’ Jake Wade, who changed my life by introducing me to distance running. He inspired me to run my first half marathon in September 2011 and I’ve been hooked ever since! Race 13.1 Durham will be my 49th officially timed half marathon!
  7. What’s your best advice for new runners or runners who are starting to race more? Run your own race. You don’t have to fit into a mold or idea of what a running/training should be like. Go out and enjoy the race for reasons that are important to you and everything will fall into place.
  8. Favorite Race 13.1 event you’ve completed? That’s tough, but I think it would have to come down to Evans, GA or Tallahassee, FL. Those were both very scenic.
  9. Favorite place to run? From nature to neighborhoods with beautiful houses, I love running anywhere scenic.
  10. Favorite post-race meal? My post race meal is always different and that’s part of the fun! I love trying the local food wherever I’m racing. For example after the Asheville Race I went to Farm Burger and after the Tallahassee race I went to Voodoo Dog!
  11. What does your recovery look like with running so many races? This is hard for me to answer, because my answer just isn’t fair. I always tell people I think my magic super power is recovery. I may have soreness after a race that slows me down but when I wake up the next day I’m fine. Must be the post-race chocolate milk!
  12. What goals did you have for this year? Did you accomplish them? I wanted to finish my first 50K ultra, which I did on December 5! I wanted to improve my half fanatics (Online Running Club) status by first running six half marathons in 16 days (Earth status), which I completed. Secondly, by running 13 half marathons in 79 days (Mercury Status). I also wanted to run the most Race 13.1 races, which I accomplished when I crossed the finish line at Race 13.1 Durham.

Congratulations to Amy on a very successful year! We can’t wait to see what 2016 has in store for you!

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02 Dec 2015

BCBSNC Race 13.1 Durham Reminders

If you’re racing with us at BCBSNC Race 13.1 Durham on Saturday, Dec. 12, we have some important race information listed out below to help ensure you’re ready to go on Race Day!

If you’re not registered yet, we have limited spots remaining, so don’t wait! Click here to get registered for the inaugural, holiday-themed half marathon, 10k and 5k!

Questions? We’re here to help! Contact us with any race questions you have!


Race 13.1 Durham Athlete Guide

All of the information below (and more!) can be found in your athlete guide.
Click here to view the guide!


Race 13.1 Durham Information

Race Day timeline:
6:30-7:30am – Race Day packet pick-up and registration
7:30am– Holiday Kids Fun Run
8:00am – Half Marathon starts
8:15am – 10k & 5k start
10:00am – 10k & 5k awards will be announced
11:00am – Half Marathon awards will be announced
DurhamMedal


  • Packet Pick-up:
    – Thursday, Dec. 10: 4pm-8pm at Omega Sports- New Hope Commons (5426 New Hope Commons Dr, Durham, NC 27707)
    – Friday, Dec. 11: 12pm-8pm at Omega Sports- New Hope Commons (5426 New Hope Commons Dr, Durham, NC 27707)
    – Saturday, Dec. 12 (Race Day): 6:30am-7:30am in Runners Village near the start/finish area at North Gate Mall (1058 West Club Blvd., Durham, NC 27701)

  • Remember that you may pick up a packet on behalf of someone else, but you must be able to present that person’s ID.  We will also accept a clear picture of that person’s ID on your smart phone.

  • Need to change your race distance? Not a problem! You can change your race distance online until your bib number is emailed to you. Once your bib number has been sent to you, you must change your race distance in person at packet pick-up.

Durham


  • Post-Race Beer: All runners of legal drinking age will receive two free beers from Boston Beer Co., so remember to bring your ID!


  • Course: You can find a course map, turn-by-turn directions and a course video on the Durham Course Maps page.

  • Parking: There is a parking deck at Northgate Mall right next  to the start/finish area (1058 W Club Blvd, Durham, NC 27701) where runners will be able to park for free on race day. Click here to view a race day parking map.

  • Gear Check: There is ample parking in close proximity to the start finish area; as such we will not offer gear check.

  • Awards: Awards will be given to male and female overall and age group winners based on chip time. Winners must be present to receive their prize; awards will not be mailed out. For details on age group and overall awards, click here.

  • Giveaway: All runners will have the chance to win $1,000 compliments of Yadkin Bank! Click here for more details!

    Yadkin Bank Check


  • Share your race day photos with us! Find us on Instagram and Twitter – @race131 – or post to our Facebook page! Be sure to use the hashtag #Race131Durham!

  • Runner Safety:
    – Health: We encourage you to check with your doctor prior to running any race  distance!
    – Hydration: Be sure to use all hydration stations along the course and make sure  you’re well hydrated in the days leading up to the race!
    – Sleep: Be sure you get enough rest in the days leading up to the race!
    – Weather: Be sure to check the weather again on race morning to ensure you’re  wearing proper attire for that day’s weather
    – Food: Proper nutrition and fuel are necessary to ensure a great race! Check out our blog for pre-race nutrition tips!
    – Volunteers: We have many wonderful volunteers who will help direct you along the course – please adhere to their direction to ensure safety during the race.