A BLOG ABOUT ALL THINGS 13.1

All posts in General

25 Feb 2016

Big News for Race 13.1!

Dear Runners,

We are excited to share some big news for Race 13.1, for the Raleigh Running Community, and for our city! Recently, we came to an agreement with the City of Oaks Marathon, Inc. Board of Directors for Race 13.1 to take over the operation and management of the City of Oaks Marathon, Rex Healthcare Half Marathon, and Old Reliable 10k. Race 13.1 and City of Oaks have worked closely together for the last four years, sharing best practices and providing support and assistance for each other at races. Race 13.1 owes the City of Oaks team a great deal of appreciation and gratitude for their guidance and assistance when Race 13.1 began with a single event that started the Midtown Race Series and in turn became what is now Race 13.1.

CofOaksMarathon_choice-02       RACE131SQUARE2

For the past 10 years, the City of Oaks Marathon has been led by its all-volunteer Board of Directors, in addition to the dedication and hard work of the event’s Race Director, Ron Wahula, over the past five years. The board and Ron, who we’re excited will continue as the Race Director, have built an event that not only provides an incredible race experience for runners, but also gives back significantly to the local community. Producing an event of the quality and size of City of Oaks take a great deal of work and sacrifice. The realities of time commitments for the race’s large number of volunteers, coupled with a strong desire to ensure that the race remain in hands of a local organization that is wholly committed to the city of Raleigh and its running community made this transition a natural fit.

From the runner’s perspective, the race will remain a standalone event that showcases the best of our city. We are dedicated to ensuring that this race remains the same exceptional City of Oaks Marathon that we all know and love. Like many of you, members of our team at Race 13.1 have been direct beneficiaries of the hard work and dedication of the City of Oaks Board through participating in past races and being residents of the city of Raleigh where much of their charitable work has been directed.

We are honored and excited to carry this race forward. We are committed to building on the incredible foundation that has been established over the past nine years, working diligently to ensure that the charitable work in our city continues as a result of this great event, and continuing to create a first-class race experience for runners, partners, and sponsors. The City of Oaks Marathon organization and its board will remain intact and continue with their charitable work in the community, which will be made possible by the continued contributions to the City of Oaks Marathon 501c3 Non-Profit from the race proceeds.

The November 6, 2016 City of Oaks Marathon will be the 10th anniversary of the race, and we look forward to announcing some new initiatives in the months to come to celebrate this anniversary and continue to improve the experience of our runners.

We thank the City of Oaks Board of Directors for entrusting us with this great responsibility, and we thank the Raleigh Running Community for their dedication to running local. We are committed to going the extra mile for every single participant, whether they finish first or last, to ensure that this race honors the hard work that it takes for each participant to get to the start line. We can’t wait to see each of you at the start line in November!

Thank you,

Race 13.1 & City of Oaks Marathon

17 Feb 2016

Run Like Meb

The 2016 Charleston Marathon was a disappointing race for me. I left the event feeling discouraged and disillusioned with running. Strangely enough, my despondency was in no way related to my running performance that day. Actually, I didn’t run at all; I was a spectator. Having run a marathon a mere week before, I was in prime spectating condition. I felt I could be of great support to the Charleston Marathoners, particularly along the course’s toughest points: the scenic wasteland at mile 9, and the dreaded traffic circle runners would enter and reenter from miles 18-23.

My BRF Rosemary and I formulated a plan that allowed us to cheer on friends running the race. Saturday night I created marginally funny signs of support. By 8:30 a.m. on Sunday morning, we were positioned at mile 9, just across from Waste Services and Container Salvage Co. When the leaders started coming through around 8:45, we cheered like we were crowd support at the US Olympic Marathon Trials.

Few runners glanced our way.

No nods, no tiny waves. Nonetheless, we continued holding our ridiculous signs and cheering for every runner like he was an Olympian. I thought for sure when “slower” runners like me started coming through, they would be the ones smiling, nodding, waving, and/or shouting words of thanks. Although quite a few smiled or chuckled to themselves as they turned our corner, most avoided eye contact and looked like they were trying to pretend two weirdos weren’t out alone in the cold holding stupid signs. After our friend Paul came through, we gave up with mile 9 and moved on to mile 18. Surely at this point in the race, the marathoners would need all the support they could get.

Mile 18 looked much like mile 9, though the runners were spread further apart from each other and wore more pronounced grimaces of the pain and exhaustion. Rosemary and I, now part of a small handful of spectators, continued to cheer madly and wave signs. The runners, by and large, ignored us.

I left the race feeling confused. Were these Charleston Marathoners made of sterner stuff than I? Did they need no cheering squad? Were they such bada**es they couldn’t lift a hand to wave or make eye contact to acknowledge their supporters?

My question was answered the day of the US Marathon Trials in Los Angeles. The Trials saw athletes like Des Linden round the final corner and raise her hands to arouse even more cheers from the crowd. Meb Keflezighi rounded that same turn carrying an American flag and high fiving spectators who lined the streets. Amy Hastings Cragg, who won the women’s race, stayed close to the finish line so she could watch an exhausted Shalane Flanagan cross the finish line in third. When Shalane collapsed, Cragg (who must have been exhausted herself) was the first to catch her as she fell. Linden, Keflezighi, and Cragg are some of the fastest runners in the world, and they all took the time to thank the crowd, or show their support to those who supported them.

Image used from Shalane Flanagan's Instagram account

Image used from Shalane Flanagan’s Instagram account

So runners, I challenge you to be more like Meb. In fact, I ask all of you, what are you doing to show your appreciation of those in the crowd? If the one of the fastest marathoners in the world can high five spectators at the US Marathon Trials, you can at least crack a smile or salute your fans. While spectators don’t attend a marathon expecting thanks for what they do, that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t give it.


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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08 Feb 2016

Football Widow Respite

Last Sunday I realized I am a football widow. I am one of those poor women who loses her husband to the NFL all day Sunday, Monday nights, and (darn you football) Thursday nights, too. While thousands of fans cheer madly for the Washington Redskins, Jacksonville Jaguars, or the Carolina Panthers, I silently mourn the loss of my husband’s attention for four quarters.

Unlike other football widows, for whom the light at the end of the tunnel is only starting to show now that the Super Bowl is over, a little light was gifted to me every Sunday. You see, Sunday is my husband’s long run day, and not even football can stop what an upcoming marathon has put in motion: race training. Last Sunday, for fifty-five minutes and forty-seven seconds, I had my husband all to myself. There was no need to compete with DeMarco Murray, A.J. Green, or the Manning Brothers. Justin and I were out on the road, me on my cruiser bike, basket stocked with water and Gatorade, he keeping pace beside me. For eight miles, I was free from football.

An even greater gift is a race weekend. Due to Justin’s work schedule, we run a lot of half marathons on Sundays. This means while football is happening, we are either running a race, celebrating just finishing a race, or driving home from a race. All three of these possibilities free us from the cables that bind our lives to the NFL. We are free to enjoy each other’s company without Todd Gurley or Rob Gronkowski tagging along like a third wheel.

So, thank you running. Thank you for being a sport that doesn’t involve pass interferences, fantasy drafts, or the NFL Network. Thank you for putting my husband and me out on the open road, with only ourselves for company. Thank you for not being football.

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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15 Jan 2016

A Motorist’s Guide to Runners

It can get pretty hairy out there for motorists who must share the road with other vehicles, mopeds, bicycles, runners, walkers, and occasional stray chickens or spooked cats. As someone who is both a runner and a motorist, I feel I can advise on how to courteously and safely share the road with runners. As for advice on sharing the road with bicyclists and wildlife, you’ll have to find another expert.

Dear Motorist,

1. If I am running in the bike lane, please stay in your lane. Don’t try to assert your vehicular prowess by aiming for me when I am in a lane reserved for the slower and smaller. You stay in your space, I’ll stay in mine.

2. If the speed limit in a small neighborhood is 20 miles an hour, don’t go 45. Don’t even go 35. There are runners out there, as well as walkers, their dogs, and children playing in the street. Do what you need to on the highway, but when you pull into your neighborhood, slow it down and try to enjoy the fact that you are almost home.

3. If no cars are approaching in the opposite direction on any given road, it would be courteous of you to move your vehicle over a foot or two. In instances like this, you can think of the road like a movie theater. If the theater is crowded, other moviegoers get it when you must sit right next to them. If the road is crowded, as a runner, I get it when you can’t move over. If a movie theater is empty, it’s just weird to sit right next to someone you don’t know. Same is true on the roads. If no one is coming and motorists don’t move over, it’s just weird.

4. If you want to roll down your car window and yell something like, “You go girl! Attack that hill!” while I’m running up a killer hill, please feel free do so. This might give me the adrenaline boost I need to make it to the top. On the other hand, if you feel like catcalling, keep your window rolled up and your dirty thoughts to yourself. I’m marathon training, for Pete’s sake!

5. Keep your trash and other items inside your vehicle. The road is not your garbage can, and I don’t want to see your McDonald’s wrappers littering the Johns Island bridge or have to hurdle an old couch cushion to continue on my run. This is marathon training, people, not the steeplechase.

6. Remember your humanity. While the safety of our vehicles makes it easier to be more aggressive and disconnected from others, remember you are a human, as are those runners out there on the roads. Follow the rules of common courtesy, don’t just reserve them for dinner parties and meeting your in-laws for the first time.

Sincerely,

Someone who is a runner and a motorist

 

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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21 Dec 2015

Runner Profile: 15x Race 13.1 Finisher Amy Enz

Amy Enz is one of just seven of our runners who completed 13 or more Race 13.1 half marathons in 2015 ! We’re excited to feature Amy, who actually finished 15 total races with us this year – the most of any Race 13.1 runner – in this month’s runner profile! Click here to see more of our runners who earned their 13x, 7x and 3x bonus medals this year, and check out more Bonus Bling opportunities here!

  1. Amy EnzDid you always plan to run this many Race 13.1 races this year? What motivated you to run this many? I didn’t always plan to run this many Race 13.1 races. I thought the seasons pass was a unique and innovative idea that would allow me to run at least seven of the races. After all the spring races, I discovered the series scoring on the website and saw how many people had run just as many, or more races than I had. I guess the competitive part of me decided then that I’d like to run the most races out of everyone. I love a good challenge!
  2. What do you enjoy about Race 13.1 events? I love that Race 13.1 gives me an affordable opportunity to have mini vacations where I get to try new things, accomplish new challenges and do what I love, to run.
  3. What’s your favorite part of racing? I truly believe runners are just incredible people. Whether you come to win, to raise awareness or money for charity, in a group, as an individual, to lose weight, to maintain weight, to push your limits, to dress up, to have fun or just to enjoy being around amazing people outdoors, everyone truly inspires me and I like being around that energy.
  4. What motivates you to keep racing? There are so many reasons to keep going! There’s always a new challenge to overcome, a new theme to be a part of, an awesome medal to collect or a ‘top’ race to check off the list. I especially like inaugural events and being the first to run that particular course. Most importantly though, running makes me healthy physically and mentally. I don’t think I’ll ever run out of goals because I just keep making new ones!
  5. Speaking of goals, have you set any goals for 2016? I want to become a Marathon Manic (Online Running Club) and Double Agent (when you are qualified as a Marathon Manic and Half Fanatic) by running six half marathons and six full marathons in a six-month time frame!
  6. How long have you been running and racing half marathons? I’ve actually been running cross country and or track since middle school. I was never really fast but I enjoyed running and being part of the team. I was lucky enough to be on teams that didn’t cut people, but I didn’t always compete because that was based on performance. In 2009 I met ‘Coach’ Jake Wade, who changed my life by introducing me to distance running. He inspired me to run my first half marathon in September 2011 and I’ve been hooked ever since! Race 13.1 Durham will be my 49th officially timed half marathon!
  7. What’s your best advice for new runners or runners who are starting to race more? Run your own race. You don’t have to fit into a mold or idea of what a running/training should be like. Go out and enjoy the race for reasons that are important to you and everything will fall into place.
  8. Favorite Race 13.1 event you’ve completed? That’s tough, but I think it would have to come down to Evans, GA or Tallahassee, FL. Those were both very scenic.
  9. Favorite place to run? From nature to neighborhoods with beautiful houses, I love running anywhere scenic.
  10. Favorite post-race meal? My post race meal is always different and that’s part of the fun! I love trying the local food wherever I’m racing. For example after the Asheville Race I went to Farm Burger and after the Tallahassee race I went to Voodoo Dog!
  11. What does your recovery look like with running so many races? This is hard for me to answer, because my answer just isn’t fair. I always tell people I think my magic super power is recovery. I may have soreness after a race that slows me down but when I wake up the next day I’m fine. Must be the post-race chocolate milk!
  12. What goals did you have for this year? Did you accomplish them? I wanted to finish my first 50K ultra, which I did on December 5! I wanted to improve my half fanatics (Online Running Club) status by first running six half marathons in 16 days (Earth status), which I completed. Secondly, by running 13 half marathons in 79 days (Mercury Status). I also wanted to run the most Race 13.1 races, which I accomplished when I crossed the finish line at Race 13.1 Durham.

Congratulations to Amy on a very successful year! We can’t wait to see what 2016 has in store for you!

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14 Oct 2015

Why Run in Costume?

While October is prime half-marathoning season in many parts of the country, I also consider it to be the unofficial start to Running-in-Costume Season. Costumed racers begin to appear in October when people dressed like runners are chased by other runners in creepy zombie costumes. The season continues into November when Turkey Trots all across America help runners burn off those extra Thanksgiving calories while dressed as pilgrims, Pocahontas, or poultry. In my opinion, the official season concludes with all the New Year’s Day Polar Bear Plunges where, in terms of costumes, anything goes.

Why join others and wear a costume for your next race?

Reason #1: No Pressure

When you are running a 5k with your three best friends, and you’re each one of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, there’s no pressure to PR. You don’t have to worry about what your GPS watch says or whether you are running negative splits. After all, you’re only as fast as the slowest turtle.

Reason #2: Prizes

Races held during Running-in-Costume Season often offer prizes for those dressed in the best costumes. This means that even if you’re not the fastest runner, you can still obtain the glory and material goods that are often reserved for the first place finishers.

Reason #3: Comradery with Spectators

On our 10th wedding anniversary, my husband and I ran a half marathon dressed as a bride and groom. We had so many people cheer us on and ask to take pictures with us that we felt like Meb Keflezighi running the Boston Marathon. Wearing costumes unites people in a way that wearing regular running clothes cannot.

Running in Costume

Reason #4: Comradery with Friends

Unless you are five years old and a twin, it’s typically not encouraged that you intentionally match your clothing to someone else’s for large social gatherings. Running-in-Costume Season is a loophole for this societal norm. Wearing the same outfit as a running buddy, spouse, friend, or family member allows you to show your solidarity with “your people” during a race. My friend Rosemary and I already have matching Christmas sweater running shirts to wear to this year’s Reindeer Run. Wearing matching outfits will proclaim to all who see us that we are running buddies. After all, Running-in-Costume Season is a socially acceptable time of year to do so.

So go ahead, call your running buddy or rope in your unsuspecting friends and make plans to run in costume. There’s no pressure to PR, but you might get chased by a zombie or have to wear a turkey hat.

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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27 Jul 2015

21 Reasons to Go Virtual with Race 13.1

Need an excuse to run the Mira Coast to Coast Virtual Race 13.1? Here are 21!

1. You know you’re going to run anyway!

2. You can make two Make-A-Wish kids’ wishes come true!

3. No expensive hotel or travel costs.

4. The race medal has movable parts (the beach ball spins)!

Virtual medal proof

5. You can run on the day most convenient for you (during Race Week, August 23-29).

6. It’s free, but donations to Make-a-Wish earn you Race Bucks (credit) for future Race 13.1 events!

7. You can get 20% off Sweaty Bands just by registering.

Sweaty Band Image2

8. Running keeps you young; even Runner’s World says so.

9. Do you need more quality time with your running friends? This is the perfect opportunity.

10. You can earn two free Caveman bars just by registering. Yum!

11. It’s a good excuse to carb load.

12. Do you need something to post on Facebook? #runbrag #VirtualRace131

13. You’ll be on vacation that week? It’s great motivation to keep up your running routine!

14. There will most likely be a flushable toilet at the starting line.

15. Need a taper week?

16. You can see how your race time stacks up against runners all around the country!

17. Eat dessert guilt-free thanks to those extra calories you burned!

18. Customize your race experience by ordering only what you want: a spinning beach ball medal, an award-winning Race 13.1 event shirt, and/or other great Race 13.1 gear!

Virtual Shirt Medal Combo

19. Do you love to run with your dog, but other races won’t allow it? It’s acceptable for the virtual race!

20. Because your friends have no reason not to run it with you… It’s free, it’s for a good cause, and you and your friends can pick the day you want to run during Race Week, Aug. 23-29!

21. Because You Can & You Will.

Reasons to Run Virtual Race

Need one more reason to run the Race 13.1 virtual race? Visit Race131.com for more information!


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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17 Jul 2015

Virtual Reality

ICYMI: Race 13.1 added one more race to the 2015 calendar! The Mira Coast to Coast Virtual Race 13.1 is now open for registration! Register by August 22, and run a half marathon, 10k, 5k or 1 mile anytime during Race Week, August 23-29! For more details, visit Race131.com!


In the late 80’s and early 90’s, the concept of virtual reality became a big deal. As a kid, I remember imagining a world where nearly comatose humans wore goggles and isolated themselves from the real world in order to fully immerse themselves in the virtual world. Though the goggle-wearing, alternate reality people imagined in the eighties isn’t quite the reality that came to pass, much of our lives are still a bit “virtual.” Thanks to Nintendo’s Wii remote, gamers enjoy playing virtual tennis, bowling, golf, and boxing.

Notice Wii Sports does not include virtual running. I suspect there’s a reason for this, and if we take a look at two common virtual terms, we may see why.

Term #1: “Virtually Done”

This term refers to the idea that one is “almost” done with a task. For example, if your boss asks you about your progress on a particular project, you can inform her that you are virtually done and will be ready to present tomorrow. There is no “virtually done” in running. I do not recall ever speaking to someone at mile 12 of a half marathon and saying, “I am virtually done with this race!” In a half marathon, you’re either done, or you’re not. There’s no finisher medal for anyone who virtually finished… only for those who finished.

Virtual medal proof

Term #2: “Virtual Tours”

Virtual tours are handy for visiting a place that, for one reason or another, is nearly impossible to get to. Running races is the opposite of a virtual tour. When runners participate in a half marathon, the 20,000 or so steps they take in a race involve the feet, lungs, and heart. For the hour or three that a runner is moving, she is immersed in the sites, smells, and sounds of a particular course. It doesn’t get any more real than this.

While the virtual world removes us from reality, running races grounds us in it. While Nintendo may be able to capture the glory of an overhand serve in tennis using their Wii remote, there is no way to recreate the experience of a runner chasing down a strong finish or the magnificence of accomplishing a goal one spent months training for.

For those of you that are still fans of the virtual world, don’t worry. There are still some virtual terms that do apply to us runners. First, running is virtually free. While not completely free, when compared to others sports, it costs are minimal. Second, running makes you feel virtually indestructible. You may be tired at mile 12 (and virtually finished, according to some people), but finishing a race and achieving what you set out to accomplish only makes you feel like you can accomplish even more. Finally there is the virtual race. If you can’t physically be present for an event dedicated to your favorite charity, or held by your favorite race organization, you can experience it virtually, Don’t worry though, it won’t involve wearing goggles and drooling on yourself in a bean bag chair. You’ll still be out breathing fresh air, running real streets, and sweating real sweat. And when you finish, you won’t get a virtual medal… you’ll get a real one in the mail.

Hop on the virtual bandwagon, and join Race 13.1 for its first virtual race! Click here for more details!

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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16 Jun 2015

An Open Letter to My Neighbors

You can read more of Julie Bullard’s thoughts on her blog, SerialRunner.com!

Celebrities are always writing open letters to each other (think Sinead O’Connor to Miley Cyrus), so I would like to take my newfound official blogger status as an opportunity to write an open letter to my well-meaning, but socially inept neighbors.

My husband and I average 12 half marathons a year. We train for those races together, but we don’t run together. Justin is faster than I am, so running together would require him to slow down too much or require me to speed up and have a heart attack. Rather than run together and put either of ourselves at this disadvantage, Justin gets on one of our cruiser bikes with me while I run, and then we flip-flop for his run.

A typical jaunt around our neighborhood looks and sounds something like this:

(Julie on bike, Justin on foot)
To Justin: Wow, you’re like a machine, man.
To Julie: When are you going to get off the bike and start running?

(Julie on foot, Justin on bike)
To Julie: What are you doing running?
To Julie, again: If you keep this up, one day you will be as good as him (pointing to Justin).
To Justin: Wow, it’s weird to see you on the bike.

(At neighborhood social functions)
To Justin: How many miles did you run today, man?
To Julie: Oh, you’re the one that is always on the bike while your husband runs.

(On walks, when we occasionally get the double whammy)
To both of us: You guys are slacking off today. What’s with the walking?

Neighbor 1-001

Julie’s husband, Justin, taking his turn to run.

Before I am overlooked or harangued by my neighbors anymore for my “inability” to run, here it goes:

Dear Fellow Villagers,

I am no slouch. I actually run just as much as Justin, if not more. I’m just slower. And many times I run by myself- no bike support included. I don’t know if I am invisible to you because my husband is faster, shirtless, or better looking than me, but I am going to need your support, too. Both Justin and I are in training for a marathon, and when we are both running so many laps around the neighborhood that we are dizzy, we are both going to need your applause. Actually, I made need it a little more because Justin has been able to store your applause like a squirrel stores nuts for the winter. I don’t have anything from you in reserve.

Also, when we go on walks, please don’t call us slackers. Since when is walking “slacking off”? We get exhausted from running so much! Sometimes standing on two feet is an accomplishment, much less walking two miles around the neighborhood after the dinner we ate at 8:30 because we were running when everyone else was chowing down.

Next time you see me, tell me I remind you of the Energizer Bunny, or ask me if I need a drink of water, just don’t ask me when I’m going to start running. Chances are, I already finished for the day.

Regards,
The Invisible Runner


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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09 Mar 2015

A Good Problem to Have

If you purchased a Race 13.1 season pass, you may not realize it yet, but you have a looming problem. With 16 races on the schedule already, and more races coming soon, that’s a lot of finisher medals you’ll need to proudly display. If, like us, you are a running family, you may have two dozen finisher medals on your hands by next year.

We love our finisher medals for both their appearance and the meaning behind them. Each one symbolizes months of training and 13.1 miles of hard running. For this reason, they’re not just the kind of thing we can throw in a box and forget about. Since we became serial racers we’ve run across (pun intended) a few different ways to display our medals, and come up with a few on our own.

Option #1: The Command Hook

Command hooks can be hung anywhere, and since they don’t leave any holes in the walls or do any permanent damage, they are perfect for hanging finisher medals. We have a column in our kitchen where we use a Command hook to display the finisher medal from our most recent race.

Medal Display Option #1

Medal Display Option #1

Option #2: The Vessel

This might be the easiest way to display old finisher medals, and you can display the vessel as discreetly or as proudly as the mood may strike. This option simply involves purchasing a glass vessel that suits one’s personal taste and filling it with finisher medals. Leave it on the kitchen table or tuck it away on a bookshelf somewhere. No matter what you do, this option is a great way to consolidate a massive quantity of finisher medals (and you can always buy more vessels when you run out of space in your current one).

Medal Display Option #2

Medal Display Option #2

Option #3: The Curtain Rod

This option more prominently displays one’s finisher medals. While it may involve drilling into the wall, it is very easy to slip a new medal on a curtain rod in the location of your choice. We drilled our curtain rod onto a floating shelf which allows us to display both our finisher medals and any plaques or trophies we may earn along the way.

Option3

Medal Display Option #3

Option #4: The Dream

This might be the most beautiful and creative idea we’ve stumbled across to display finisher medals. It involves looping finisher medals around the slats of the side of an old baby crib. The original idea on thistlewoodfarms.com involved using an antique herb drying rack as opposed to baby furniture. I have dreams that I’ll stumble across an old crib on the side of the road, retrieve it for myself, and finish it in that trendy, weathered look that will go well in our house. We’ll drill it into the big, blank wall upstairs in our office and never need to worry about running out of space to put our medals.

Medal Display Option #4

Medal Display Option #4

To all the serial racers and racing families out there, display your medals with style and pride! We hope one of these options allows you to show off your hard work.


 

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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