A BLOG ABOUT ALL THINGS 13.1

All posts in Training

22 Jun 2016

Eight Tips for Running in the Heat

This blog post was originally posted on www.afoodiestaysfit.com.

I don’t know about the weather where you live, but it is HOT in Winston-Salem. HOT & HUMID. I love running outside but with weather like this, it can be downright dangerous.

Here are eight tips for keeping cool while maintaining your hot running bod in the hot summer months.

1) Run in the off hours. The best option for running in the heat: don’t run in the peak heat. Go early or go late. I find that going early is cooler since the temperature has all night to drop and the roads aren’t still radiating heat from the hot day.

2) Wear breathable, wicking clothing in light colorsPlease, for the love of all that is good and wise, don’t wear cotton, especially if you live in a humid environment. It will trap the heat escaping from your body, hold onto your sweat, make you hotter, and slow you down when your shirt gets heavy from sweat. And other runners will scoff at you. 😉 Check TJ Maxx and Dick’s Sporting Goods for deals.

Wasatch Back RElay2[ This was at the end of my third leg of the Wasatch Back Relay.
The temps for this run were in the high 90s at an altitude around 7000 feet.]

3) Carry water. Drink 16 oz before you head out and carry water, even for distances when you normally wouldn’t. In the cooler months, I rarely carry water with me on runs shorter than six miles. But in the heat, I run with water. In hot temps, you will dehydrate more quickly and that water might be your savior mid-run. I love this water bottle; it straps onto your hand so you don’t have to grip it and it has a pouch for keys, a phone, etc.

4) If the sun is up, wear sunscreen. I slather SPF 70 on my face and SPF 30 on the rest of my body. Don’t worry about the sunscreen blocking your sweat. You’ll still sweat just fine. 🙂

5) Wear a breathable hat and/or sunglasses to protect your face and eyes. Squinting sucks when you’re running. I love my white Nike hat.

32292-281-017f

6) Run more slowly than your typical pace. Go by your typical effort instead of your typical pace.  Your regular pace will feel harder in the heat and humidity. Your body will adapt eventually but don’t let slower runs discourage you. And don’t push your pace if you’re not feeling strong.

7) Run with someone or tell someone when you’re going and when you’ll be back. And then check back in so they don’t worry. You never know what can happen on a run, so this is always a good idea, but especially a good idea when you’re running in extreme temps.

8 ) Listen to your body. Have no shame in taking walk breaks. Have no shame in calling it quits.  If you don’t feel well during the run, don’t push your limits. If you feel dizzy, if you notice you aren’t sweating like you normally do, or if something just doesn’t feel right, back it off and call it a day. There is no shame in knowing and listening your body.

Or reveling in massive amounts of sweat. 🙂

Meet Teri Hutcheon: Teri is a Race 13.1 blog contributor and has been running for over 15 years and runs multiple half marathons and 5Ks every year (sometimes multiple races a month!) and has run one marathon (so far!). She shares her running tales and workouts on her blog, www.afoodiestaysfit.com. You can also find her on Twitter and Instagram (@afoodiestaysfit), and Facebook.com/afoodiestaysfitblog.

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14 Mar 2016

5 Ways to Curb Your Nerves for Your First Half Marathon

Signing up and running your first half marathon can at times be very intimidating. Here are five tips to give you the confidence you need to run your first 13.1 with excitement and ease!

  1. Sign Up with a Friend – If there’s one thing to learn from Amy Cragg and Shalane Flanagan’s strategy during the 2016 Olympic Time Trials, it’s that sometimes all you need is your best bud by your side to get you to the finish. Going at it with a sidekick will make the entire event more enjoyable as well as provide you with constant moral support both during training and in the race itself.
  1. Train Smart – Using a coach or a professional training plan to gear up for the race takes a lot of guess work out of training. It’ll ensure that you are more than ready for the event and take away a lot of pre-race jitters knowing that you’ve done all you can in preparation. Be sure to check out Race 13.1’s FREE training plans to help you get started!
  1. Do a Trial Run – Before the race, do your last long run in everything you plan on wearing and taking with you for the real deal. Wear the exact shoes, socks, shorts, and shirt. If you plan on carrying water or nutrition, practice eating and drinking the exact amounts that you think you might need for the race to minimize any unforeseen surprises.
  2. Don’t Set a Goal Time – If you’re someone who tends to put too much pressure on yourself, consider not setting a timed goal for your first half marathon. Yes, having a goal can be very motivating, but sometimes it’s accomplishment just to finish. Not only will it take a lot of pressure off of your performance, but not checking your watch obsessively will also give you a chance to enjoy more of the atmosphere around you.
  3. Don’t Take Yourself Too Seriously – Go out of your way to create great memories for your first race! Wear a costume, take selfies, give spectators high fives on the sidelines. Don’t ever take the fun out of running!

Meet Margaret: Margaret Molteni is a runner who moved to Memphis from Nashville to work as a Recreational Therapist, assisting individuals with disabilities. Outside of work, you can find her training for her next marathon, cooking, blogging, and always eating. For more healthy and delicious recipes or all things running, visit Margaret’s site at www.youngandrungry.com.

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08 Feb 2016

Football Widow Respite

Last Sunday I realized I am a football widow. I am one of those poor women who loses her husband to the NFL all day Sunday, Monday nights, and (darn you football) Thursday nights, too. While thousands of fans cheer madly for the Washington Redskins, Jacksonville Jaguars, or the Carolina Panthers, I silently mourn the loss of my husband’s attention for four quarters.

Unlike other football widows, for whom the light at the end of the tunnel is only starting to show now that the Super Bowl is over, a little light was gifted to me every Sunday. You see, Sunday is my husband’s long run day, and not even football can stop what an upcoming marathon has put in motion: race training. Last Sunday, for fifty-five minutes and forty-seven seconds, I had my husband all to myself. There was no need to compete with DeMarco Murray, A.J. Green, or the Manning Brothers. Justin and I were out on the road, me on my cruiser bike, basket stocked with water and Gatorade, he keeping pace beside me. For eight miles, I was free from football.

An even greater gift is a race weekend. Due to Justin’s work schedule, we run a lot of half marathons on Sundays. This means while football is happening, we are either running a race, celebrating just finishing a race, or driving home from a race. All three of these possibilities free us from the cables that bind our lives to the NFL. We are free to enjoy each other’s company without Todd Gurley or Rob Gronkowski tagging along like a third wheel.

So, thank you running. Thank you for being a sport that doesn’t involve pass interferences, fantasy drafts, or the NFL Network. Thank you for putting my husband and me out on the open road, with only ourselves for company. Thank you for not being football.

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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15 Jan 2016

A Motorist’s Guide to Runners

It can get pretty hairy out there for motorists who must share the road with other vehicles, mopeds, bicycles, runners, walkers, and occasional stray chickens or spooked cats. As someone who is both a runner and a motorist, I feel I can advise on how to courteously and safely share the road with runners. As for advice on sharing the road with bicyclists and wildlife, you’ll have to find another expert.

Dear Motorist,

1. If I am running in the bike lane, please stay in your lane. Don’t try to assert your vehicular prowess by aiming for me when I am in a lane reserved for the slower and smaller. You stay in your space, I’ll stay in mine.

2. If the speed limit in a small neighborhood is 20 miles an hour, don’t go 45. Don’t even go 35. There are runners out there, as well as walkers, their dogs, and children playing in the street. Do what you need to on the highway, but when you pull into your neighborhood, slow it down and try to enjoy the fact that you are almost home.

3. If no cars are approaching in the opposite direction on any given road, it would be courteous of you to move your vehicle over a foot or two. In instances like this, you can think of the road like a movie theater. If the theater is crowded, other moviegoers get it when you must sit right next to them. If the road is crowded, as a runner, I get it when you can’t move over. If a movie theater is empty, it’s just weird to sit right next to someone you don’t know. Same is true on the roads. If no one is coming and motorists don’t move over, it’s just weird.

4. If you want to roll down your car window and yell something like, “You go girl! Attack that hill!” while I’m running up a killer hill, please feel free do so. This might give me the adrenaline boost I need to make it to the top. On the other hand, if you feel like catcalling, keep your window rolled up and your dirty thoughts to yourself. I’m marathon training, for Pete’s sake!

5. Keep your trash and other items inside your vehicle. The road is not your garbage can, and I don’t want to see your McDonald’s wrappers littering the Johns Island bridge or have to hurdle an old couch cushion to continue on my run. This is marathon training, people, not the steeplechase.

6. Remember your humanity. While the safety of our vehicles makes it easier to be more aggressive and disconnected from others, remember you are a human, as are those runners out there on the roads. Follow the rules of common courtesy, don’t just reserve them for dinner parties and meeting your in-laws for the first time.

Sincerely,

Someone who is a runner and a motorist

 

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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14 Sep 2015

Tips to Get to Race Day Injury-Free

You sign up for a race. You put in the miles. You pass up Friday night plans so you can get in bed early in preparation for that Saturday long run. One thing that seems like you can’t control? Showing up to race day injury-free.

I’ve showed up to races injured, and I’ve skipped races because of injuries. Neither is fun. But, after 15+ years of running and countless races, I’ve learned (sometimes the hard way) a few things that help keep me running strong, from training to the finish line.

1. Yoga

I’ve struggled off and on with IT band pain ever since I ran my first half marathon in 2005. In 2007, I had run multiple races with severe pain (despite a prescription for prednisone to help with the injury) and was under the care of an ortho and a PT. Despite their treatments, I was still running injured. I started yoga in 2008 and the IT band issues went away, and for the most part, have stayed away as long as I’m consistent in my practice.

Moral of the story : My doctors weren’t looking at me holistically. Yoga addressed a root issue that I didn’t know I had and my doctors didn’t address: severely tight muscles and muscle imbalances.

(second moral: find a good doctor!)

2. Not running through pain.

When I was training for my first marathon (which I ended up not running because of – surprise! – running injuries), I was very very hard on my body and mind. If I had to walk part of my 18 miler run because of pain, oh well. I needed the mileage! If it hurt, I tried to ignore it and keep running. I needed to run for X minutes, no less! Besides, no pain, no gain right?? Wrong. I feel discomfort all the time when running these days. But it’s discomfort from pushing my body to run faster at longer distances. It doesn’t always feel good to really push the pace. It’s downright hard! My muscles are screaming. But I’m not in tears from pain. If I’m feeling real pain, I stop running.

Moral of the story: There is a BIG difference between discomfort and pain. And it’s important to learn to identify each.

3 tips to get to race day injury-free (1)

3. Not running everyday.

I used to believe that a workout wasn’t a “real” workout unless it involved running. But part of overall fitness is being strong in many aspects and all workouts improve different parts of your body and mind. I have learned that when I run everyday I start to get injured. Yeah, that stinks but it’s true for me. I mix up my workouts with CrossFit and yoga — and the all-important rest day.

Moral of the story: Accepting that running everyday puts too much stress on my body has helped me enjoy other workouts and become a stronger athlete overall.

[For the record, I don’t, in general, think running everyday is bad as long as you don’t ignore other important parts of your overall health and fitness, and as long as it doesn’t hurt you like it does me!]

How do you avoid running injuries?

Disclaimer: I’m not a doctor. This post is not intended to diagnose or treat any injuries you have or prevent any you may have at some point in the ever distant future. I’m simply sharing what worked for me.

About the Author: Teri, located in Winston-Salem, NC, is the blogger behind A Foodie Stays Fit, where she blogs about running, racing, getting addicted to CrossFit, eating gluten-free and spoiling her boxer dog who thinks she’s human.

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24 Aug 2015

Pain Theory

As runners, we know pain. We know the sensation of burning quads from a series of hill repeats. We know the challenge of stairs the day after a marathon. We know what it feels like to have an elephant sitting on our chests when we run our seventh Yasso 800. Because my husband and I have experienced all of this (and more), we’ve developed some theories about running -related pain.

Pain Theory 2

Theory #1: Sympathy Pain

Sympathy running pain is much like sympathy labor pain. It occurs when one half of a partnership, friendship, marriage, etc. completes a particularly challenging run. Naturally, the runner experiences some pain or exhaustion following this workout. Sympathy pain occurs when the runner’s partner, friend, or spouse also feels pain or exhaustion from said workout, a workout this individual did not complete. Sympathy pains happen in our house all the time. When my husband runs twelve miles on a Sunday morning, I typically accompany him via cruiser bike. This long run renders him nearly useless for the rest of the day. He is unable to mow the lawn, cut the bushes, or make a trip to Costco as he is too tired from his long run. In spite of the fact that I have only been pedaling along at a leisurely pace on a cruiser bike, I find that my limbs feel heavy and my muscles are convinced that they ALSO ran 12 miles that morning. As a result, I am unable to refinish the furniture sitting in the garage, fold that second load of laundry, or repot those root-bound plants. Justin and I both wind up staggering around the house like zombies in need of some GU’s or good massages.

Pain Theory 1

Theory #2: The Law of Diminishing Pain Returns

The Law of Diminishing Pain Returns only occurs if a runner is already in some pain. A runner may be tormented by a nagging issue such as sore knees, some minor tendinitis, or even a particularly nasty paper cut unrelated to running. This nagging pain issue is diminished in the face of greater pain. For example, Justin has been plagued by what he thinks is some plantar fasciitis. Standing in one spot for hours (which he does for work) leaves him desperate to lie down just to alleviate the pain in his feet. About a month ago, he found an unlikely cure for this pain. We ran two half marathons, two weekends in a row. The first race lost 1400 feet of elevation in the first five miles. As a result of this downhill challenge, we were in so much pain, we couldn’t step down curbs in parking lots and found ourselves shuffling towards the handicap ramps for the next three days. Justin’s foot pain disappeared in the face of such great post-race soreness, because this is how The Law of Diminishing Pain Returns works.

Since neither Justin nor I are medical professionals, we can’t advise you as to how to proceed if any of this pain is plaguing you. What we can tell you is this: pain is a slippery slope. Ignore it and it could sideline you for months. Push through it and you may become stronger than ever. If you can distinguish between real and sympathetic, diminishing and increasing, chances are you’ll be running unencumbered by any pain at all.


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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27 Jul 2015

21 Reasons to Go Virtual with Race 13.1

Need an excuse to run the Mira Coast to Coast Virtual Race 13.1? Here are 21!

1. You know you’re going to run anyway!

2. You can make two Make-A-Wish kids’ wishes come true!

3. No expensive hotel or travel costs.

4. The race medal has movable parts (the beach ball spins)!

Virtual medal proof

5. You can run on the day most convenient for you (during Race Week, August 23-29).

6. It’s free, but donations to Make-a-Wish earn you Race Bucks (credit) for future Race 13.1 events!

7. You can get 20% off Sweaty Bands just by registering.

Sweaty Band Image2

8. Running keeps you young; even Runner’s World says so.

9. Do you need more quality time with your running friends? This is the perfect opportunity.

10. You can earn two free Caveman bars just by registering. Yum!

11. It’s a good excuse to carb load.

12. Do you need something to post on Facebook? #runbrag #VirtualRace131

13. You’ll be on vacation that week? It’s great motivation to keep up your running routine!

14. There will most likely be a flushable toilet at the starting line.

15. Need a taper week?

16. You can see how your race time stacks up against runners all around the country!

17. Eat dessert guilt-free thanks to those extra calories you burned!

18. Customize your race experience by ordering only what you want: a spinning beach ball medal, an award-winning Race 13.1 event shirt, and/or other great Race 13.1 gear!

Virtual Shirt Medal Combo

19. Do you love to run with your dog, but other races won’t allow it? It’s acceptable for the virtual race!

20. Because your friends have no reason not to run it with you… It’s free, it’s for a good cause, and you and your friends can pick the day you want to run during Race Week, Aug. 23-29!

21. Because You Can & You Will.

Reasons to Run Virtual Race

Need one more reason to run the Race 13.1 virtual race? Visit Race131.com for more information!


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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16 Jun 2015

An Open Letter to My Neighbors

You can read more of Julie Bullard’s thoughts on her blog, SerialRunner.com!

Celebrities are always writing open letters to each other (think Sinead O’Connor to Miley Cyrus), so I would like to take my newfound official blogger status as an opportunity to write an open letter to my well-meaning, but socially inept neighbors.

My husband and I average 12 half marathons a year. We train for those races together, but we don’t run together. Justin is faster than I am, so running together would require him to slow down too much or require me to speed up and have a heart attack. Rather than run together and put either of ourselves at this disadvantage, Justin gets on one of our cruiser bikes with me while I run, and then we flip-flop for his run.

A typical jaunt around our neighborhood looks and sounds something like this:

(Julie on bike, Justin on foot)
To Justin: Wow, you’re like a machine, man.
To Julie: When are you going to get off the bike and start running?

(Julie on foot, Justin on bike)
To Julie: What are you doing running?
To Julie, again: If you keep this up, one day you will be as good as him (pointing to Justin).
To Justin: Wow, it’s weird to see you on the bike.

(At neighborhood social functions)
To Justin: How many miles did you run today, man?
To Julie: Oh, you’re the one that is always on the bike while your husband runs.

(On walks, when we occasionally get the double whammy)
To both of us: You guys are slacking off today. What’s with the walking?

Neighbor 1-001

Julie’s husband, Justin, taking his turn to run.

Before I am overlooked or harangued by my neighbors anymore for my “inability” to run, here it goes:

Dear Fellow Villagers,

I am no slouch. I actually run just as much as Justin, if not more. I’m just slower. And many times I run by myself- no bike support included. I don’t know if I am invisible to you because my husband is faster, shirtless, or better looking than me, but I am going to need your support, too. Both Justin and I are in training for a marathon, and when we are both running so many laps around the neighborhood that we are dizzy, we are both going to need your applause. Actually, I made need it a little more because Justin has been able to store your applause like a squirrel stores nuts for the winter. I don’t have anything from you in reserve.

Also, when we go on walks, please don’t call us slackers. Since when is walking “slacking off”? We get exhausted from running so much! Sometimes standing on two feet is an accomplishment, much less walking two miles around the neighborhood after the dinner we ate at 8:30 because we were running when everyone else was chowing down.

Next time you see me, tell me I remind you of the Energizer Bunny, or ask me if I need a drink of water, just don’t ask me when I’m going to start running. Chances are, I already finished for the day.

Regards,
The Invisible Runner


Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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06 Apr 2015

Age Is Just a Number

Last June I was scrolling innocently through my Twitter feed when I stumbled across this tweet via Runner’s World, “Is it safe for 40-year-olds to exercise?” I nearly choked on my Goldfish crackers when I read those words. At the time of the tweet, I was 38 years old and still claiming that, if my high school track coach were available to coach me after school every day, I’d be running my 100-meter high hurdle times from the early 90’s. Of greater significance, 57 days prior to the offensive tweet, 38-year-old Meb Keflezighi won the Boston Marathon.

Age is Just a Number

Since the offensive tweet, the following records have been broken:

1. In June of 2014 Runner’s World reported that 91-year-old Harriet Thompson had the fastest marathon time ever for a woman in her age group, finishing the Rock-n-Roll San Diego Marathon in 7:07:42. After age-grading her results, this makes her one of the best runners in the world.

2. In February of 2015, Competitor reported that 80-year-old Anne Garrett broke the half marathon record for her age group, running the Surf City Half Marathon in 2:13:23.

3. Both Competitor and Runner’s World reported on Deena Kastor’s record setting half marathon at Rock-n-Roll Philadelphia where she broke the Masters World Record with a time of 1:09:36. Um, and she also finished third in the race. Not third for her age group. Third overall.

4. Just today I watched a fantastic video on the Runner’s World website that showed the 200-meter record breaking run of 90-year-old Charles Eugster.

Apparently, none of these people got the memo about the dangers of exercising over 40.

As it turns out, that initial Runner’s World tweet led me to an article debunking the idea that exercise is dangerous for those over 40. Turns out, exercise is good for everyone, no matter what their age.

Now that I don’t have to retire from running in less than a year, I have big plans for my running future. After reading an article in Parade Magazine about 94-year-old Olga Kotelko and her 26 World Records in masters track and field, I’m inspired. I’m inspired not just by Olga, but by Harriet, Anne, Deena, Charles, and all the other athletes who continue to break down walls and defy the world’s expectations of masters athletes. I plan on looking forward to my entry into the world of masters running and hope to flirt with some records myself. Keep your eyes on the 2055 editions of Runner’s World; I plan on being there.


 

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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12 Jan 2015

Confessions of a Running Shoe Hoarder

The other day I was reading the December issue of Competitor Magazine, which ended with a quick profile of a man named Burton Goldfield. Burton isn’t a professional athlete; he was named the most-admired CEO by the San Francisco Business Times in 2010. Competitor featured him because of his commitment to fitness, for both himself and his employees. There were plenty of things to like about Mr. Goldfield, but what I liked most was his response to Competitor’s last question, “Do you have a go-to running shoe?” On page 69 of the magazine, he proudly proclaimed, “I have 23 pairs. I cycle through them until they are eventually retired to a shelf in the garage. Yes, I save them all. I never want to part with a pair.”

I was comforted by this CEO’s words. I assume Burton Goldfield, being a CEO, is extremely intelligent, and a man capable of making tough decisions. If a CEO can’t part with his old running shoes, how are mere mortals like ourselves supposed to be able to do it? I took Burton’s words as permission to continue hoarding my own stash of running shoes, both old and new.

IMG_2520

These are just a few of Julie’s numerous running shoes!

When it comes to our old shoes, neither my husband nor I can bear to part with our original Adidas Energy Boost shoes, which changed the way we ran forever. The ones with threadbare soles and hundreds of miles behind them are stashed reverently in the back of our closet. While we know they can be sent somewhere and recycled into playground equipment, don’t the shoes on which we PR’ed 10 times over deserve to be gold leafed and displayed proudly in our own personal running museum?

Anyone who has fallen in love with a particular incarnation of running shoe can attest to the heartbreak that comes along with a new and “improved” model of the same shoe. After learning our lesson the hard way, we’ve started stocking up on our favorite models. My closet currently has four brand new backup pairs of running shoes and a fifth pair on the way from Adidas.

While Burton Goldfield’s garage is likely a little bit bigger than mine and can probably fit way more pairs of running shoes, I’ll continue to hoard mine no matter the consequences. Old pairs will be given the respect they deserve for carrying all 135 pounds of me over a distance that likely could get a person from Charleston to Miami. They’ll remain in the back of my closet like any good old running shoe deserves.

I’ll remain on the lookout for new pairs to hoard. If any of you spot a pair of original Adidas Energy Boosts in a women’s size 12 for sale somewhere, let me know. I’ll add them to my stash.

Meet the Bullards: Julie and her husband Justin are neither medical, nutrition, nor fitness professionals. Their only claim to expertise in the area of running is the frequency with which they run half marathons. Both members of the Half Fanatics, Julie and Justin average one half marathon per month, but have run as many as three in 30 days. Julie writes about the regularity of mistakes they make in their constant quest to run, and hopes that readers of this blog can learn from both their shortcomings and successes. You can follow them on Twitter @runbullardsrun.

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